Following a draft Interagency Report published in February, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”) has published NISTIR 8200: Interagency Report on the Status of International Cybersecurity Standardization for the Internet of Things (IoT), which seeks to assess the “current state of international cybersecurity standards development for IoT.” In this effort, the Report defines the major areas where IoT is currently being used and evaluates various IoT cybersecurity standards commonly applied in those areas. To evaluate the surveyed IoT standards, the Report relies on a framework that breaks the standards down into twelve core areas, each of which designates a distinct, common element of cybersecurity measures.

Where IoT is Being Used the Most

To help evaluate the current understanding of cybersecurity risks involved in IoT applications and the methods used to measure them, the Report overviews major IoT technologies and how they are deployed. It then breaks down the network-connected devices, systems, and services comprising IoT into five major categories of application, explaining the common components of each:


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Responding to the rise of interconnected technology, the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) has recently issued an introductory document in a planned series of cybersecurity publications addressing Internet of Things (IoT) privacy risks.  Open for comment through October 24, 2018, the Draft NISTIR 8228, Considerations for Managing Internet of Things (IoT) Cybersecurity and

Crowell & Moring has issued its Litigation Forecast 2018: What Corporate Counsel Need to Know for the Coming Year.”

 The Forecast cover story, “Data, Data Everywhere,” takes an in-depth look at the opportunities and challenges general counsel face in navigating the Big Data revolution.

 While data is a driver for innovation

“There are many ways to surveil each other now, unfortunately,” including “microwaves that turn into cameras, et cetera.  So we know that that is just a fact of modern life.”  Kellyanne Conway, March 12, 2017 Interview with New Jersey’s The Record.

Data from microwaves-turned-cameras has yet to appear in court, but data from other IoT

On June 19, 2017, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a public comment regarding the National Telecommunications & Information Administration’s (NTIA) draft guidance titled Communicating IoT Device Security Update Capability to Improve Transparency for Customers.  In commenting on the guidance, the FTC acknowledged the benefits of and challenges to IoT device security, and encouraged

Last week, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced an agreement settling claims against a television manufacturer arising from the alleged unauthorized collection of television viewing data.  The FTC, along with the State of New Jersey, alleged that certain “smart TVs” manufactured and sold by VIZIO, Inc. and its subsidiary VIZIO Inscape Services (collectively, “VIZIO”) failed

Discussion headlines:  New guidelines for IoT; Russia blocks access to LinkedIn; Standing under the TCPA; Long distance search warrant power

The DHS and NIST Release Guidelines for the IoT

This week, both the Department of Homeland Security and the National Institute of Standards and Technology released a set of guidelines intended to secure the IoT. 

In a recent Law360 publication, C&M attorneys Rachel Raphael and Ellen Farrell discuss how the Internet of Things (IOT) can present complex insurance coverage issues.  As they explain, the tangible and intangible nature of IOT products can cause particular confusion between traditional general liability policies (which may exclude coverage for cyber incidents) and stand-alone cyber

The Panama Papers Leak – An overview on histories’ biggest data leak; Article 29 Working Party about to release opinion on EU-U.S. Privacy Shield; EU: GDPR and PCJ DPD about to be approved next week – final consolidated text published by Council; US: New HIPAA Audit Protocol Released as a Guidance Tool for phase two of Compliance Audits; U.S. Sneak News: Defend Trade Secrets Act, NPRM and Sony Settlement Approval. EU: GDPR, PCJ DPD and PNR Directive adoped by Parliament; U.S.: House Judiciary Committee approves E-Mail Privacy Act; Senate to require airlines to report cyberattacks; FTC issues online tool identifying applicable law for health apps; Global: Turkey releases first comprehensive Data Protection law; Connected cars found vulnerable for cyberattacks; Data Breaches May Waive Attorney-Client Privilege?; Encryption Continues to Dominate Privacy Headlines; Hospital Settles with HHS for $ 2.2 Million in HIPAA Action; Southern District of New York Adds Ransomware Conspirator to Hacking Case; European and Canadian Data Protection Authorities Investigate IoT Devices; Norway Requires Data Breach Notification for Individuals

The Panama Papers Leak – An overview on histories’ biggest data leak

On April 3, 2016, reports revealed that a set of 11.5 million confidential documents (“the Panama Papers”), providing detailed information about more than 200,000 offshore companies connected to Panamanian legal service provider Mossack Fonseca, had been made available to German Daily Newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung by an anonymous source in 2015.

The documents, which form part of the biggest data leak in history, reveal aspects on (potential) exploitations of offshore tax regimes and other illegal purposes, such as fraud or drug trafficking. Among the people concerned are not only big companies, but also twelve national leaders among 143 politicians, celebrities, government officials or other law firms. The Süddeutsche Zeitung, given the scope of the leak, involved the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and about 400 other journalists in 76 different countries to investigate and analyze the documents. ICIJ has promised to publish a full list of companies involved in early May 2016.

Mossack Fonseca, the leaked firm, defended its commercial conduct, stating that itself would always comply with applicable laws and carry out thorough due diligence on its clients. However, the leak will have a huge impact on the offshore business, as the biggest selling point of this business, secrecy, has been massively cracked.


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The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) has published a request for comment on federal policy related to the Internet of Things (IoT). For more information, please refer to our post on C&M Health Law. Crowell & Moring is available to assist in preparing comments in advance of the May 23,2016 filing deadline.