In conjunction with the 2015 American Bar Association annual State of Criminal Justice publication, Louisa Marion and I have published a new chapter on “Digital Privacy and E-Discovery in Government Investigations and Criminal Litigation.” The article provides an in-depth look at many of the current and cutting edge issues raised by digital privacy

Last week, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation convened to hold a hearing on “The Connected World: Examining the Internet of Things.” Signaling that Congress may be interested in delving into this area, Senators pressed witnesses about the best ways to strike a balance between fostering innovation and protecting consumer interests. Senators and witnesses also wrestled with whether lawmakers should take an industry-by-industry or global approach to regulating this area –or if lawmakers should enter this space at all.
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Last week, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) simultaneously issued reports summarizing cybersecurity examination findings and recommending certain investor precautions. The SEC’s report, based on the results of examinations of more than 100 broker-dealers and investment advisors, made a number of notable findings, including:

• More than two-thirds

Recently, Louisa Marion and I analyzed the Supreme Court’s far-reaching decision in Riley v. California, 573 U.S. __ (2014), and its implications going forward. In Riley, Chief Justice Roberts concluded that today’s cell phones (which the Court called “minicomputers”) are fundamentally different than physical containers: their storage capacity is virtually unlimited; they contain a

Social media has become an ubiquitous means of communication in today’s society, with more than 90% of today’s online adults using social media regularly.  With this backdrop, it is no surprise that social media implicates an evolving legal landscape.  In the  “Data Law Trends & Developments: E-Discovery, Privacy, Cybersecurity & Information Governance”, on

In an unexpectedly sweeping opinion, a nearly united Supreme Court today recognized the fourth amendment’s protection for digital privacy. Chief Justice Roberts’ opinion in Riley v. California is grounded on the Founders’ abhorrence of general warrants and unparticularized intrusions into our private lives. It highlights the pervasiveness of cell-phone (“minicomputer”) use, as well as the

As part of Crowell’s “Data Law Trends & Developments:  E-Discovery, Privacy, Cyber-Security & Information Governance,” Steve Byers and I examined the hottest topics in E-Discovery in Government Investigations and Criminal Litigation.  Our report begins on page 15, and explores recent trends in this rapidly expanding field and forecasts potential developments with Federal Rule

In conjunction with the 2014 American Bar Association annual State of Criminal Justice publication, Louisa Marion and I have published a new chapter on “E-Discovery in Government Investigations and Criminal Litigation.” The article provides an in-depth look at many of the current and cutting edge issues raised by e-discovery in this context, including

Emails often provide key evidence in conspiracy-related investigations and subsequent litigation. More recently, social media and text messages have provided additional evidence for such matters. In response, most companies have enacted policies to educate their employees about using these communication mediums. However, recent antitrust investigations and federal lawsuits in the financial services industry are utilizing electronic communications made via Bloomberg Terminal as key evidence. The reported Bloomberg chat evidence in these cases makes clear that companies should reassess whether their internal compliance policies and training need to be updated to mitigate the risk that Bloomberg Terminal evidence – and not just emails and social media content – could create legal liability for the company.
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Last week, the Department of Justice announced that Kazuaki Fujitani, a former Denso Corporation executive, agreed to plead guilty to obstruction of justice charges in connection with an Antitrust Division price fixing investigation. Fujitani agreed to serve one year and one day in U.S. prison for destruction and concealment of records and documents under 18