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Frederik Van Remoortel is a partner in the Brussels office of Crowell & Moring and has been admitted at the Brussels bar since 1998. He joined Crowell & Moring in 2001.

Frederik focuses on corporate, commercial, data protection, and labor & employment law.

Frederik regularly assists international companies in setting up, operating, and restructuring their business in Belgium. This includes corporate transactional matters including acquisitions, mergers, joint ventures, and other collaborative arrangements, as well as general corporate counseling.

FCC adopts privacy rules; Privacy Shield challenge; Amendments to EU data transfer decisions; FTC data breach guidance; DOT vehicle cybersecurity best practices; HHS guidance on HIPAA and FTC compliance

FCC approves privacy rules for broadband providers

In a 3-2 vote, the Federal Communications Commission approved new rules governing internet service providers’ collection and use

Hospital pays $2.1MM HIPAA settlement; Dynamic IP addresses protected under EU laws; EU guidance on GDPR coming soon; California’s new privacy compliance tool; banking regulators consider cybersecurity; FCC privacy proposal comments; OMB’s new privacy office; DFARS finalizes Safeguarding Rule

Hospital pays $2.1M to settle alleged HIPAA violations

St. Joseph Health, a California-based health system, reached

FCC broadband privacy proposal; Potential challenge to FTC privacy enforcement power

FCC to consider broadband privacy proposal

On October 6, the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued proposed rules that would impose on broadband providers privacy regulations similar to those implemented and enforced by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).  The proposal calls for

Hamburg DPA orders WhatsApp to stop sharing data with Facebook; GAO: HHS Needs to Improve is Digital Health Protection Rules; Notice and Choice Becoming Par for the Course for Interest-Based-Ads in Apps

German Data Protection Authority of Hamburg orders WhatsApp to stop sharing data with Facebook

On September 27, 2016, the Hamburg Commissioner for

NHTSA Issues Voluntary Driverless Car Guidelines; European Privacy Supervisor proposes Digital Clearing House for coherent handling of Big Data cases; Facebook and Power Ventures Battle Over the Scope of the CFAA; Arizona Supreme Court: Police Cannot Search Unlocked, Unattended Phone; German consumer group urges Whatsapp to stop sharing data with Facebook; German DPA issues guidelines

Privacy law meets antitrust – EU Commissioner Vestager on data in competition law; ECJ to rule on admissibility of Privacy class actions; Northern District of California Sends Yelp Privacy Suit to the Jury; EU Advocate General finds EU-Canadian PNR pact unlawful; New York Unveils New Cyber Security Rules for Financial Services Organizations; New Jersey Senate Passes Shopping Privacy Bill; NIST Issues Mobile Threat Guidance

Privacy law meets antitrust – EU Commissioner Vestager on when privacy issues can lead to antitrust concerns

European Competition Commissioner Margarethe Vestager has commented on the relevance of privacy issues with regard to EU antitrust rules. According to Vestager, current investigations of the German Federal Cartel Office regarding Facebook’s “privacy issues” would “not necessarily” lead to competition law concerns, even though both fields of law might correlate under certain circumstances.

In the investigations at issue, the German Federal Cartel Office is alleging Facebook of abusing an alleged ‘dominant position’ in the market for social networks by imposing unfair conditions regarding the privacy settings for Facebook accounts on its users. The German antitrust regulator is arguing that users would have “no choice” whether to accept the conditions or to terminate their account, because there is no real alternative to the well-known social network. Under Article 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (‘TFEU’), “dominant companies are subject to special obligations. These include the use of adequate terms of service as far as these are relevant to the market.”

It still remains to be seen whether Facebook will ultimately be found in breach of EU antitrust rules relating to its Privacy Policy. On a more general matter, however, the Commissioner’s statements seem to confirm that indeed, companies controlling vast amounts of data may be considered able to prevent market entry by withholding this data from potential competitors who could not reproduce comparable datasets themselves and therefore might violate Article 102 TFEU. Companies that might fall in this category should therefore be prepared that not only privacy regulators, but also antitrust authorities might potentially be questioning them regarding their use of data in the future. Nevertheless, “simply holding a lot of data” would not be enough to raise antitrust suspicions, Vestager appeased.


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HHS Jumps on the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Bandwagon; Third Circuit on Economic Loss as a basis for Negligence Claim; FTC workshop on Ransomware; German draft implementing law for GDPR revealed.

HHS Jumps on the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Bandwagon

Because of recent news reports confirming that cyberattacks against healthcare agencies have increased 125 % in the past five years, HHS is encouraging HIPAA Covered Entities and Business Associates to share information to combat future attacks.

HHS, based on authority from Executive Order 13591 and the Cybersecurity Information Security Act (CISA), is urging Covered Entities and Business Associates to join Information Sharing and Analysis Organizations (ISAOs) to share security threat and vulnerability information related to electronic protected health information (ePHI).

Ideally, ISAOs will provide a mechanism for sharing information bi-directionally “between HHS and the Health Care and Public Health (HPH) sector regarding cyber threats and will also provide outreach and education to the HPH sector.” This press release from HHS follows a similar measure by the Department of Homeland Security, which also encourages information sharing to mitigate the risk of cyberattacks.

In developing ISAOs in the health care sector, it is critical to consider three things:

  • the standards and best practices for the creation of ISAOs to ensure that covered entities and business associates that participate gain the protections of such information sharing under CISA;
  • the data that is shared in light of what is permitted under the HIPAA Privacy Rule; and
  • how participation in an ISAO can support compliance with the HIPAA Security Rule.

Crowell & Moring is a leading expert in the creation of ISAOs and HIPAA compliance and can help stakeholders that seek to comply with HHS’s call to action to consider the intersection of these various legal frameworks


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Russians Hack Clinton Campaign System; FTC: LabMD Liable in Data Security Suit; EU Member States issue statement on Privacy Shield; NIS Directive published – Implementation into national law by May 2018; EU Data Protection Supervisor: e-Privacy directive should meet GDPR-requirements.

Clinton Campaign Data Breach brings data security into 2016 campaign yet again

On July 29, an F.B.I. official told the New York Times that computer systems used by the Clinton presidential campaign were hacked in the latest in a string of cybersecurity attacks targeting political entities. The Times noted the attacks appeared to have been carried out by the Russian intelligence services.  These revelations follow news of similar attacks carried out earlier in the summer, including a Russian government hack of the Democratic National Committee’s computer network. Investigations into both attacks are ongoing.

FTC Reasserts Data Security Enforcement Powers in suit against LabMD

Late last week, the FTC issued its long-awaited final order in its investigation of LabMD’s alleged unfair data security practices. FTC filed charges against LabMD, a clinical laboratory used by physicians, for allegedly failing to protect sensitive personal information for over 750,000 patients.  An ALJ had earlier dismissed FTC’s charges, holding that LabMD’s data security practices failed to cause substantial consumer injury. The Commission unanimously reversed that decision.

FTC claimed that LabMD “lack[ed] even basic precautions to protect . . . sensitive consumer information maintained on its computer system. Among other things, it failed to use an intrusion detection system or file integrity monitoring; neglected to monitor traffic coming across its firewalls; provided essentially no data security training to its employees; and never deleted any of the consumer data it had collected.” Firms collecting personal information should note that future FTC enforcement is likely to note the absence of any of these systems as evidence of sub-par data security practices.

This suit follows the FTC’s 2014 victory in the Wyndham case, which validated the FTC’s authority to regulate data security.  For more information on the Wyndham decision, see the Crowell Data Law blog post on the subject.


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A European Court of Justice (ECJ) advocate general released his opinion September 23 in the matter of Maximillian Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner, a case that questions the “adequacy” of the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor (Safe Harbor). The nonbinding opinion, which will now be considered by the full court in the coming months ruled: (1) that

On June 15, 2015, Justice Ministers in the Council reached agreement on a general approach concerning the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This allows the Council to start negotiations with the European Parliament (which formally adopted its compromise text for the GDPR in March 2014) with a view to reaching overall agreement on the GDPR.